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Research Fellow

Department

Microbiology and Plant Pathology
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Co Supervisor
Lerato Maubane

I am a Research Fellow at University of Pretoria with the Forestry and Agricultural Biotechnology Institute ‎‎(FABI). My current research focuses on foliar disease of Eucalyptus. I ‎completed my BSc in Plant Protection and MSc. degree in Plant Pathology at the Guilan University in Iran. I obtained PhD my ‎at FABI under the direct supervision of Dr. Marieka Gryzenhout, Prof. Bernard Slippers and Prof. Mike Wingfield. My PhD ‎project was taxonomy and ecology of associated Botryosphaeriales on Acacia karroo in South Africa.‎

 

Botryosphaeriales (Ascomycota) species are common and diverse members of fungal communities that infect native and non-‎native woody plants. They can be serious pathogens and involved in diseases on native trees, but commonly occur as ‎endophytes. These fungi are also often moved locally and globally with plant material. To interpret patterns of movement as ‎well as host and geographic association, a clear taxonomic and species identification framework is required. The aims of ‎studies in this thesis were to consider the species diversity, structure and variation over time of Botryosphaeriaceae associated ‎with the native tree A. karroo, which   which occurs commonly across the South African landscape. The patterns of ‎overlap of Botryosphaeriaceae between A. karroo and three other native trees, namely Celtis africana, Searsia ‎lancea and Gymnosporia buxifolia at a single location was also considered. Finally, the diversity of Botryosphaeriaceae ‎associated with healthy tissue types, compared with those from die-back symptoms on A. karroo was studied. These questions ‎were by sampling A. karroo from 23 sites across its distribution in South Africa, with more intensive sampling done in the ‎Tshwane area over three years. In total, 19 species of the Botryosphaeriales were identified, of which seven were newly ‎described. ‎

 

New species from my PhD project:‎

 


 

 

Working in the Lab! Gardening. Running, walking, yoga. Reading.


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Publication
Slippers B, Crous PW, Jami F, Groenewald JZ, Wingfield MJ. (2017) Diversity in the Botryosphaeriales : Looking back, looking forward. Fungal Biology 121(4):307-322. 10.1016/j.funbio.2017.02.002
Marsberg A, Kemler M, Jami F, Nagel JH, Postma-Smidt A, Naidoo S, Wingfield MJ, Crous PW, Spatafora J, Hesse CN, Robbertse B, Slippers B. (2017) Botryosphaeria dothidea: A latent pathogen of global importance to woody plant health. Molecular Plant Pathology 18:477–488. 10.1111/mpp.12495
Yang T, Groenewald JZ, Cheewangkoon R, Jami F, Abdollahzadeh J, Lombard L, Crous PW. (2017) Families, genera, and species of Botryosphaeriales. Fungal Biology 121(4):322-346. 10.1016/j.funbio.2016.11.001
Zlatković M, Keča N, Wingfield MJ, Jami F, Slippers B. (2016) Shot hole disease on Prunus laurocerasus caused by Neofusicoccum parvum in Serbia. Forest Pathology 46(6):666-669. 10.1111/efp.12300
Zlatković M, Keca N, Wingfield MJ, Jami F, Slippers B. (2016) Botryosphaeriaceae associated with the die-back of ornamental trees in the Western Balkans. Antonie van Leeuwenhoek 109(4):543-564. 10.1007/s10482-016-0659-8
Jami F, Slippers B, Wingfield MJ, Loots MT, Gryzenhout M. (2015) Temporal and spatial variation of Botryosphaeriaceae associated with Acacia karroo in South Africa. Fungal Ecology 15:51-62. 10.1016/j.funeco.2015.03.001 PDF
Slippers B, Roux J, Wingfield MJ, Van der Walt FJJ, Jami F, Mehl JWM, Marais GJ. (2014) Confronting the constraints of morphological taxonomy in the Botryosphaeriales. Persoonia 33:155-168. 10.3767/003158514X684780 PDF
Jami F, Slippers B, Wingfield MJ, Gryzenhout M. (2014) Botryosphaeriaceae species overlap on four unrelated, native South African hosts. Fungal Biology 118:168-179. 10.1016/j.funbio.2013.11.007 PDF
Jami F, Slippers B, Wingfield MJ, Gryzenhout M. (2013) Botryosphaeriaceae diversity greater in healthy than associated diseased Acacia karroo tree tissue. Australasian Plant Pathology 42(4):421-430. 10.1007/s13313-013-0209-z PDF
Jami F, Slippers B, Wingfield MJ, Gryzenhout M. (2012) Five new species of the Botryosphaeriaceae from Acacia karroo in South Africa. Cryptogamie Mycologie 33(3):245-266. 10.7872/crym.v33.iss3.2012.245 PDF