The Tree Protection Co-operative Programme (TPCP) was established based on a very small team of researchers at the University of the Free State and focused on a single threatening Eucalyptus disease problem. The programme has since grown to become highly recognised internationally as the single strongest programme dealing with pest and pathogen problems in plantation forestry in the world. The TPCP has also brought huge energy to agricultural research and education in the biological sciences in South Africa. For example, it formed the foundation for the establishment of the Forestry and Agricultural Biotechnology Institute (FABI) at the University of Pretoria, which in just 16 years has become a flagship research centre promoting many aspects of plant improvement in South Africa.

The TPCP represents a Co-operative research initiative between the University of Pretoria and all private forestry companies in South Africa. It is also supported by the South African Government Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. Other than long and short-term research, the TPCP provides members with extension services, training of forestry students at Universities, access to a world-class disease and pest diagnostic clinic and guidance in dealing with tree pest and pathogen problems. One of the key products of the TPCP is to produce biological control agents for insect pests that damage plantations belonging to members. This work depends on outstanding quarantine green house and related facilities.

The TPCP formed the basis for the establishment of the Department of Science and Technology (DST)/National Research Foundation (NRF) Centre of Excellence in Tree Health Biotechnology (CTHB). This programme focuses on the health of native South African trees. Given that pests and pathogens are moving from native to non-native plantation trees and vice versa, there is substantial synergy between these two programmes.

New Publications

Wingfield BD. (2018) People, funding and constant learning are key to creating research excellence. The Conversation (21 January) http://bit.ly/2DtrY3F PDF
Slippers B, Singh S. (2018) African mothers in science need more support. Providing it is actually easy. The Conversation (10 January) http://bit.ly/2Dp0cl5 PDF
Liversage J, Coetzee MPA, Bluhm BH, Berger DK, Crampton BG. (2018) LOVe across kingdoms: Blue light perception vital for growth and development in plant–fungal interactions. Fungal Biology Reviews 10.1016/j.fbr.2017.11.003
Liu FF, Barnes I, Roux J, Wingfield MJ, Chen SF. (2018) Molecular phylogenetics and microsatellite analysis reveal a new pathogenic Ceratocystis species in the Asian-Australian Clade. Plant Pathology 10.1111/ppa.12820
Adamson K, Mullett MS, Solheim H, Barnes I, Müller MM, Hantula J, Vuorinen M, Kačergius A, Markovskaja S, Musolin DL, Davydenko K, Keča N, Ligi K, Priedite RD, Millberg H, Drenkhan R. (2018) Looking for relationships between the populations of Dothistroma septosporum in northern Europe and Asia. Fungal Genetics and Biology 110:15-25. 10.1016/j.fgb.2017.12.001